Archive for the ‘Course syllabi’ category

Syllabus Honduras 2010

August 15, 2011

Framingham State College

C. Louis Cedrone International Education Center

Framingham MA USA

Collaborative Leadership and Organizational Change

 

Overview

Traditionally schools have adhered to line-staff organizational structure with top down decision making. While education leadership organizations, leaders in the field, and those publishing and writing in the professional literature  have for decades advocated a more collaborative approach to leadership and organizational structure for the most part schools remain as line-staff organizations with central top down leadership. This course will consider an alternative approach to leadership and organizational structure. The focus of the course will be on collaborative leadership and participatory decision making. A maxim for the course is:

Those affected by a decision ought to be involved in the process of making, implementing and being held accountable for decisions made.

The intention is that the course itself will be presented as a practicum in collaborative leadership and participatory decision making. You will not be lectured on these two components as much as you will be involved in doing what is intended in the terms “Collaborative Leadefrship” and “Participatory Decision Making”.

Learning Objectives

Consistent with the maxim stated immediately above learning objectives for the course will be developed as a communal effort involving all course participants. That exercise will begin as a pre-course assignment and be developed as a whole class exercise in the first few hours that the course is in session. The procedure to be followed in undertaking this exercise is found on the Yahoo Web site provided for the course.

Pre Course Exercise Excise #1: As a pre course exercise each participant is to:

  1. Develop a set of personal learning objectives for the course.
  2. Your learning objectives must relate to the content of the course: Collaborative Leadership and Organizational Change.
  3. State your learning objectives in list format.
  4. There is no set, required or recommended number of objectives that you must list. Your learning objectives indicate what you hope to gain from the course.
  5. Forward your list of learning objectives to me [Larry Creedon at lpcreedon] two weeks for the first meeting of the course on September 13, 2010.
  6. Upload your list of learning objectives in the designated place of the Yahoo Web Site developed for the course   XXXXXXXXX.
  7. Bring two print copies of your objectives to class on Day One.
  8. At that time we will engage in an exercise where all individual learning objectives will be consolidated into one composite list. Those learning objectives will guide us during our learning experience.

Instructor Objectives

Instructor Objectives and participant learning objectives are not the same thing. This point will be clarified in class. My instructor objectives for this course are as follows:

  1. Foster a learning environment where and leadership is promoted and practiced consistent with a collaborative leadership approach.
  2. Foster a learning environment where “those affected by decisions are involved in the process of making, implementing and being held accountable for decisions made”.
  3. Introduce participants to the theory and practice of collaborative leadership and to the organizational structural requirements of such an approach.
  4. Introduce and practice a constructivist approach to leadership and organizational structure.
  5. Introduce and practice with participants strategies and tactics applicable to a constructivist approach to learning.

Yahoo Web Site:   XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX

A Yahoo web site has been established for the exclusive use of course participants. Each participant is required to sign on to the web site. It is a vital organ for the course. Many learning materials are posted on the site. In addition you will be required to post assignments you do on the web site. The sweb site will remain active and available for you and your course colleagues to use after the course has ended.

Course Learning Materials

There is no required textbook for the course. The primary sources for course learning materials are:

  1. Internet [Search Engines such as Google, Bing, Yahoo]
  2. Monographs authored by me [Larry Creedon]. They are found on my web site: LarryCreedon.wordpress.com as well as on the Yahoo web site for the course.

P

Pre Course Exercises

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Syllabus Kuwait 2010

August 15, 2011

Framingham State College

C. Louis Cedrone International Education Center

Framingham MA USA

Collaborative Leadership and Organizational Change

 

Overview

Traditionally schools have adhered to line-staff organizational structure with top down decision making. While education leadership organizations, leaders in the field, and those publishing and writing in the professional literature have for decades advocated a more collaborative approach to leadership and organizational structure for the most part schools remain as line-staff organizations with central top down leadership. This course will consider an alternative approach to leadership and organizational structure. The course will not focus on the more traditional elements of administration, management, supervision and top down leadership. The focus of the course will be on collaborative leadership and participatory decision making. A maxim for the course is:

Those affected by a decision ought to be involved in the process of making, implementing and being held accountable for decisions made.

The intention is that the course itself will be presented as a practicum in collaborative leadership and participatory decision making. You will not be lectured on these two components as much as you will be involved in doing what is intended in the terms “Collaborative Leadership” and “Participatory Decision Making”. An anticipated result of such an approach is Organizational Change.

Learning Objectives

Consistent with the maxim stated immediately above learning objectives for the course will be developed as a communal effort involving all course participants. That exercise will begin as a pre-course assignment and be developed as a whole class exercise in the first few hours that the course is in session. The procedure to be followed in undertaking this exercise is found on the Yahoo Web site provided for the course.

Pre Course Exercises

Excercise #1: As a pre course exercise each participant is to:

  1. Develop a set of personal learning objectives for the course.
  2. Your learning objectives must relate to the content of the course: Collaborative Leadership and Organizational Change.
  3. State your learning objectives in list format.
  4. There is no required or recommended number of objectives that you must list. Your learning objectives indicate what you hope to gain from the course.
  5. 5.   Forward your list of learning objectives to me [Larry Creedon at lpcreedon(at)aol (dot) com] two weeks before the first meeting of the course scheduled for Sunday, January 9, 2011.
  6. Upload your list of learning objectives in the designated place of the Yahoo Web Site developed for the course   XXXXXXXXX.
  7. Bring two print copies of your objectives to class on Day One.
  8. At that time we will engage in an exercise where all individual learning objectives will be consolidated into one composite list. Those learning objectives will guide us during our learning experience.

Due Date: Submit to lpcreedon@aol.com two weeks prior to the first meeting of the course scheduled for Sunday, January 9, 2011.

Post on Yahoo Site: Post your list of Learning Objectives on the Yahoo Web site for the course under the category: “Pre-Course Exercises, #1”.

Exercise #2: This exercise can be found in the earlier syllabus dated November 2010 and already forwarded to you by Professor William M. Gordon. This exercise is modified from that sent to you by Professor Gordon. Choose Alternative A or Alternative B from the two cited below. You are not being asked to do both, just one. Choose either Alternative B or B.

Alternative A: Prepare a two page [approximately 500 word] paper describing[To describe is a low order cognitive term associated with Bloom’s Cognitive taxonomy] what you consider to be the characteristics of an effective classroom teacher and the elements necessary for good classroom instruction.

Oral Discussion in Class: In oral discussion in class be able to describe what you mean by “effective” and be able to identify what you consider to be “elements of good classroom instruction”. Consult the ASCD text Qualities of Effective Principals by Stronge, Richard and Catanoas well as sharing your own experience.

Alternative B: Prepare a two page [approximately 500 word] paper identifying [To identify is a low order cognitive term associated with Bloom’s Cognitive taxonomy] the leadership characteristics of an individual for whom you have worked – what did that person do to make you determine he/she was a good or poor leader.

Oral Discussion in Class: In oral discussion in class be able to describe what you mean by leadership. Be able to distinguish leadership from administration and/or management.  See the Creedon monograph in this regard found at www.larrycreedon.wordpress.com.

DO NOT post this exercise on the Yahoo Web site for the course. However bring two copies to class on Day One

Exercise Three: Refer Out to International Colleagues

Most recently I facilitated this course with professional colleagues in San Pedro Sula, Honduras. Your assignment in this exercise is to e mail one or more of the participants in the Honduras course and ask each to share with you from their recent experience a few comments with you relative to what you might expect in the course.

A list of the Honduras participants is attached. Select one or more from this list. Selecting more than one might increase your chance of receiving a response.

You might consider these examples of questions. You need not ask these exact questions, these are possible examples:

1. How was the course conducted? What approach to learning was featured?

2. How was the course content determined, and the course conducted?

3. Did the course feature lectures, group/team activities, role playing, or what?

4. Was the course relevant to your professional development needs?

5. What role did the instructor play?

6. Where participants involved in leadership roles?

5. To what extent was the course an example of “Collaborative Leadership”?

6. To what extent has the course influenced your practice?

Date Due: Write a report or an outline of your responses from Honduran colleagues and bring two copies of your report to class.  Choose whether or not to upload responses you received and your report onto the Yahoo site for the course. Uploading is voluntary.

Due Date: Submit in two weeks before the first meeting of the course scheduled for Sunday, January 9, 2011.

Instructor Objectives

Instructor Objectives and participant Learning Objectives are not synonymous. They are not the same thing. This point will be clarified in class. Instructor Objectives are written consistent with the approach advocated by the late Robert Mager [Google him] and are consistent with Bloom’s taxonomy [See Creedon monograph on Bloom’s Cognitve Taxonomy www.larrycreedon.wordpress.com

].  My Instructor Objectives for this course are as follows:

  1. Foster a learning environment where leadership is promoted and practiced consistent with a collaborative leadership approach.
  2. Foster a learning environment where “those affected by decisions are involved in the process of making, implementing and being held accountable for decisions made”.
  3. Introduce participants to the theory and practice of collaborative leadership and to the organizational structural requirements of such an approach.
  4. Introduce and practice a constructivist approach to leadership and organizational structure.
  5. Introduce and practice with participants strategies and tactics applicable to a constructivist approach to learning.

Yahoo Web Site:   XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX

A Yahoo web site has been established for the exclusive use of course participants. Each participant is required to sign on to the web site. It is a vital organ for the course. Many learning materials are posted on the site. In addition you will be required to post pre-course as well as in-class assignments you do on the web site. The web site will remain active and available for you and your course colleagues to use after the course has ended.

Course Learning Materials

  1. Text: There is no required textbook for the course. However you have been encouraged to acquire Qualities of Effective Principals, by Stronge, Richard and Catano, 2008, ISPN 978-1-41660744-1
  2. Internet:  Search Engines such as Google, Bing, Yahoo
  3. Monographs: Position papers and articles authored by me [Larry Creedon]. They are found on my web site: larrycreedon.wordpress.com
  4. Videos
  5. Articles posted on the Yahoo web site for the course.

Procedure/Pedagogy: A Constructivist Approach

The course will not focus on the traditional, basic aspects of school administration, management and supervision found in more introductory courses. However, it will distinguish between administration and management on one hand and leadership including collaborative leadership on the other. Decades of doing the same thing over and over again while seeking organizational change has not resulted in the organizational change desired especially in a democratic society

Collaborative Leadership is associated with Constructivism. Constructivism promotes the notion that those affected by a decision ought to be involved in the process of making, implementing and being held accountable for decisions made. Consistent with that mantra course participants will be involved in determining course content, pedagogy and assessment and evaluation. In this course collaborative leadership will not only be talked about, but it will be extensively practiced. Several Creedon monographs will address specific   aspects of a Constructivist approach to collaborative leadership. Successful application of collaborative leadership can set the stage for research based, defensible, lasting organizational change. A case study involving the public schools of Quincy, MA USA will be reviewed from an “insider”  first person perspective.

 

Course Requirement

1. Course participants will be involved in recommending to the course facilitator course requirements.

2. Rubrics related to learning objectives will be developed and applied. See Creedon monographs related to Rubrics.  www.larrycreedon.wordpress.com

3. Active participation in all course activities will be expected. A rubric describing  “active participation” will be developed applied. Those who shy away from verbal or oral participation need to immediately at the outset of course see the facilitator about this.  Failure to do will result in individuals be held to the participation requirement.

4. Action Research Project: All participants will engage in an Action Research project of their own choosing. The ten component approach to Action Research laid out in the Creedon monograph will be followed in engaging in AR. Participants will work in small groups of not more than three individuals. AR projects ought to be related to individual learner objectives. Much of this will be conducted in class.

Research/Evaluation Bangkok, Thailand

December 18, 2009

Research/Evaluation
Bangkok, Thailand
Syllabus
April 4-15, 2009
Instructor: Lawrence P. Creedon. Ed.D.  Web site: http://www.larrycreedon.wordpress.com

Introduction
In learning theory and pedagogy this Action Research focused course will follow a constructivist approach.  The identifying characteristics of a constructivist approach to learning are cited as Appendix A to this syllabus.
Syllabus as a Work in Process: The syllabus for this course is not cast in stone. Consistent with a constructivist approach to learning the course will be structured and presented so as to reflect the interests and needs of the learners. Course participants will participate in identifying and determining areas of course content, pedagogy, management as well as course assessment/evaluation and grading.  Some participants may find the approach significantly different from past professional development experiences. The effectiveness of the course must be assessed against its application of a constructivist approach rather than in a comparison to more traditional approaches. A paradigm shift might be being called for.
Course Learning Materials: There is no textbook for the course. However, there will be a strong reliance on the Internet. Also Creedon’s web site: http://www.larrycreedon.wordpress.com will be a primary and indispensable source.. Another source will be the course specific Yahoo cite: http://www.FraminghamBangkok09.
Objectives
Two lists of objectives are cited here. They are those that relate to the instructor and those that relate to  the learners.
Instructor Objectives:
1. Facilitate with participants a consideration of the topic of  Action Research and Evaluation in education.
2. Provide for a learning environment and process that is consistent with a constructivist approach to learning.
3. Facilitate with participants a consideration of several concepts, terms and methods related to research and evaluation in education.
4. Facilitate participant involvement in conducting action research into either instructor identified issues, or to those issues identified by individuals as well as small teams of participants.
Learner Objectives:
1. You will commit at least 40 clock hours to fulfilling the requirements of this course
2. Given an instructor provided list of topics and concerns common to research, in pairs you and a partner will research at least three of the topics listed. You will   Post your findings on the Yahoo site established for this course: FraminghamBangkok09. In conducting your research you will use at least two instructor developed and provided  guides to Action Research. They are Creedon’s ten point approach to Action Research and Creedon’s exercise on The Reflective Practitioner  – A Three Part Approach to Action Research. They are found at www. larrycreedon. wordpress.com.
3. You will use the instructor provided  Benjamin Bloom Six Category Cognitve Domain Taxonomy as a process vehicle in reporting on your Action Research. Found at: http://www.larrycreedon.wordpress.com
4. Given an instructor provided list of suggested research topics or identifying an issue of your own choosing, each participant working independently will engage in  a Three Step Reflective Practitioner Action Research exercise of your own choice
5. As a member of a small group/team of no more than two other colleagues you will engage in a Ten Step Action Research project of your own choosing.  See Creedon monograph found at: http://www.larrycreedon.wordpress.com.
6. You will develop a set of personal rubrics by which you will hold yourself accountable for personal achievement in the course. Bloom’s cognitive taxonomy will be followed in developing the rubrics. Examples of Bloom based rubrics are cited in Appendix B. See Creedon monograph at http://www.larrycreedon.wordpress.com

Course Grade
Your grade in the course will be accomplished in response to:
1. Completing all research assignments cited above
2. Evidence that you have followed the two research guides cited above.
3. Your participation in all  activities in the course as well as on site discussion sessions.
4. Your personal set of course expectations and the extent to which they have been met.
5. Your personal set of rubrics by which you will hold yourself accountable for course content.

English Proficiency and Learning Style Concern
If you are concerned about your English language proficiency or if your learning style is such that you do not readily participate orally in class then inform me immediately, no later than Day One of the course.
Pre Course Assignments: Due March 22, 2009.
Before the course begins you are to complete the  pre course assignments already shared with you. The assignments are due to Creedon  by e mail at lpcreedon@aol.com or lpcreedon@gmail.com no later than 14 days before the first session of the course. [MARCH 22, 2009]..  The three assignments already shared with you are:
1. Your list of a personal  expectations for the course. Submiited to Creedon  before course begins.
2. Your response to a series of questions. Submitted to Creedon before course begins
3. Your familiarity with the following named Creedon monographs. The content of these monographs will not be “taught” in class; however, it will be necessary for you to be familiar with them by the time our course begins. If you are not, then you will be lost. The monographs are found at http://www.larrycreedon.wordpress.com. They are
a. Four Questions in the Pursuit of Excellence in Education
b. A Constructivist Approach to Learning
c. Bloom’s Taxonomy
You can expect to be engaged in small group sessions related to the content of these monographs
4. The Creedon monograph: “A Constructivist Approach to Action Research” is a primary source for this course. In your Action Research project for the course you will follow the ten steps of the process laid out in the monograph. Absolute, total familiarity with the content of this monograph is essential..
Sharing of Research Findings
.:All research and course assignments will be Posted on FraminghamBangkok09. As a result it will available for all course participants to read, study and comment on.
.
Topics: Common for All
Common For All
The issues cited immediately below will be considered by all participants working in pairs. One report from you and your partner will be posted on FraminghamBangkok09. You and your partner will consider at least three of the topics cited here. The common topics are:
1. What is meant by the term “research in education?”
2. What are the characteristics of and standards for research?
3. How does research in education compare with that in other professions?
4. What is meant by the term “Selected Research?” Does it apply to education?
5. To what extent is the process of learning guided by research? Cite examples.
6. What is meant by “Qualitative and Quantitative” research? Cite examples.
7. What is meant by “Validity and Reliability?” Cite examples.
8. What are the different types of tests used in schools? Cite examples.
9. How many different kinds of research are there? Cite examples.
10. Relate the concept of intuition as considered in the book Blink by Malcolm Gladwell to education.
11. What application does contemporary brain research have for classroom practice?
12. What is the history of the testing and research movement in education?
13. What do teachers need to know about educational research and statistics?
14.  We practice our profession at a time when testing is center stage. It is expressed in grades being given to students, the “College Boards,” the NCLB law, and others. What do scholars and commentators say about each of these. What does research say? What do you say?
Suggested Individual Reflective Practitioner Research Topics:
You will be required to conduct individual research in one of the below cited areas, or to select a topic of your own choosing.  You are not obligated to choose one of the below. With the instructor’s approval you may research an issue of your choosing. If you choose another topic:
1.  Clearly identify the topic you wish to consider via personal e mail to lpcreedon@aol.com
2.  Offer a statement of rationale for doing so.
3. Include your rubrics as to how you will hold yourself accountable.
4. Indicate the type of research you will be conducing and the research method you will follow
Suggested Topics:  If you do not choose to select your own topic, choose one of these.
1. How do cultural differences influence learning?
2. For decades innovation in the practice of education has been cited as the cause of school failure. Can this assertion be supported? [ See Creedon monograph:: “Innovation as the Cause of School Failure”].
3. What is meant by the term “Selected Research?” How can it be recognized? What are its effects? Cite examples.
4. Define, analyze, and compare and contrast research in education with that of other professions. Offer your evaluation and make recommendations. Cite examples.
5. Consider several alternative approaches to second language learning. Use Bloom’s taxonomy as a procedural guide. Cite examples.
6. To what extent has research in education affected the process of education and especially second language learning?.
7. Design a research based program in teacher education for in-service professional development.
8. Make an extensive list of words and terms about education and learning used in the professional literature and verbal discourse. Define each term, including if relevant, its contrasting and conflicting definitions. Render an opinion as to the impact varying definitions have on the practice of education.
9. Classroom management and discipline is a reoccurring theme in education. Using Bloom’s taxonomy as a guide to consider several alternatives. Include your opinion.[(See Creedon monograph on Robert Tauber: Classroom Management).
10.  In the United States opinion polls are a reality. To what extent are they used in Panama? To what extent do they influence practice? To what extent ought they to influence practice?
.11   Malcolm Gladwell in his recent book Blink focuses on the frequently discredited use of intuition as a valid way in coming to know. Conduct a search of the literature on this concept and report your findings. Include reference to how intuitive learning is used, discouraged and/or applied in schools.
12. Contemporary brain research shows a strong relationship to learning the brain. Familiarize yourself with the Creedon monograph related to John Medina’s 2008 book Brain Rules. Relate the content of the monograph to your practice.
Appendix A
Identifying Characteristics of Constructivism

Learning is student centered
Learning is an interactive process
Learning begins in doubt
Learning is the result of doing and undergoing experience
Learning is experience based
Discovery learning
Exploratory learning
Participatory decision making
The teacher as a facilitator of learning as opposed to a dispenser of knowledge

The characteristics of constructivism cited below are not comprehensive, but they do suggest major components of a constructivist platform.

1.     Learners construct their own knowledge beginning with what they already know, exploring what needs to be known next and determining the quality and effectiveness of their pursuit through authentic assessment and application.
2.    All learning begins in doubt about the validity of an idea. The goal of doubt is the restoration of belief. (Pierce, James).
3.    Learning takes place in the personal zone of cognitive development between what is already known, what is not known and what is desired to be known (Vygotsky).
4.    Learning is achieved best through a socially interactive process (Dewey, Vygotsky).
5.    Learning is best achieved when the undertaking is consistent with the stages of human development (Rousseau, Piaget).
6.    Learning is an experience based process of inquiring, discovering, exploring, doing and undergoing (Dewey).
7. The process of coming to know is neither random nor eclectic, it has structure
(Bruner, Bloom).
8.    Learning proceeds in spiraling fashion including laddering, scaffolding, weaving, and dialogism (Bruner, Rogoff).
9.    Cognitive development occurs in a socio-cultural context – the social milieu of individual achievement and the interaction between the learner and adults as well as his/her peers in culturally valued activities. (Riordan – Karlsson, p.18).
10    The interactive process in coming to know needs to be guided by structured cognitive and affective taxonomies (Bloom, Krathwohl).

Reference: Creedon, Constructivism Theory and Application.

Appendix B
Examples of Bloom based rubrics. Many of these were developed by former students in courses with Creedon. Use these rubrics as a guide in developing your own rubrics.

Examples of Three Types of Rubrics
Those Developed by Instructor, by You, and used in Peer Assessment
Below are three examples of rubrics used for different purposes: 1.Developed the by Instructor, 2  Developed By you or 3.Used in assessment by a peer.
The first and third examples are consistent with the six categories in Bloom=s cognitive taxonomy as modified by Creedon.
In the examples Bloom’s cognitive domain levels are identified by number. They are::
1  Information                         4. Synthesis
2. Comprehension                  5. Evaluation
3. Compare and Contrast        6. Application
The second example relates to a rubric used in assessment by a peer.
A four point scale is used in assessment. The fourth point indicates exemplary work. The meaning of exemplary must be defined and defended by the person awarding it. The fourth point is named after Monica, a student from San Roberto Institute in Monterrey, Mexico who suggested it.

An Example of Instructor Generated Rubrics B Consistent with Bloom

Activity                       No points              One Point           Two Points        Three Points        Monica – Exemplary

1. Pre Course Reading: Text, monographs and other material.
No evidence oft having read the   assigned material. No reference to text, monographs or other  or materials in assignments, class discussion, or interaction with instructor
Limited understanding of text or assigned materials in written or oral assignments. Mostly limited to Bloom levels 1 and 2 Little at 3 to 6.
Comprehension adequate at Bloom levels 1 and 2.  Limited at Bloom levels 3 to 6.
Clear and distinct critique at all six levels of Bloom.
Not applicable

2. Creedon Monograph(s).
Considered are:

_________________
No evidence of monograph(s) having been read. No reference to in class assignments, discussion or interaction with instructor.
Same as above
Same as above
Same as above
Exemplary critique of monograph(s).
Application to own practice. Indication of going beyond monograph(s)   in continued development of topic of monograph. I am able to defend why I think so and I do so below.

3.Learning Theory
1. Bloom
2. Constructivism
3. Tyler
4.____________
No indication of understanding Bloom, Constructivism, Tyler, or _____________________ (Circle as appropriate).
Same as above
Same as above
Same as above
Excellent critique of Bloom, Contructivism Tyler or ____________________.
Remainder same as above.

An Example of Student Developed Rubric: Self Assessment B These rubrics DO NOT follow Bloom=s taxonomy.
No Points                          One                                  Two                                Three                      Four (Monica)

1. Familiarity with text, monographs,  or other materials
I skimmed the materials looking for main ideas. I do not have a clear understanding of the principles shared in the materials.  I did not participate in class discussion.
I read the materials by the start of class. I was able to discuss its content in class. I made little effort to consider Bloom levels 3-6.
I read the materials. Consistent with Bloom I am able to refer to the materials in class discussion and in responding to assignments.
I have studied the materials and am able to critique them using Bloom levels 3-6.
I am able to apply aspects of the material to my own practice. I am prepared to defend my views referenced earlier in this rubric and do so below.

2. Explain concept of Classroom Management (CM) as understood and practiced by me.
I have no consistent or identifiable approach to CM.
My basic approach to CM is: If it works do it. I do not consider the rationale or theory of the approach. I Aborrow@ from successful approaches used by colleagues.
I try to be consistent in my approach to CM. I am not very familiar with various approaches to CM. I  try to implement an approach to CM known as: _______________________________________________________________
I am familiar with a variety of approaches to CM. I am most comfortable with and try to implement the approach identified as:____________________________________________________
I am prepared to defend orally my approach to CM and in doing so can identify its theoretical foundation.

3. Explain the extent to which I provide for  the various Learning Styles of my students. For example, the impact of Gardner or Levine on my practice.
I make no effort to identify or respond to the individual Learning Styles of my students.
I am aware that students have different Learning Styles. I have no theoretical understanding of them beyond that shared in professional development activities.
I am well versed in the understanding of learning styles. I try to adapt my teaching and Classroom Management to the learning styles of my learners.
I am a student of learning theory. The study of learning styles is a component of my personal program of professional development.
I am prepared to defend orally my provision for learning styles of my students. I can cite the theoretical basis for my approach and can reference specific applications.

An  Example  of  Peer Assistance or Assessment by a Critical Friend (CF).  Consistent with Bloom.  (Educational Leadership 3-2002).
The purpose of this exercise is for a peer to act as your CF in assisting or assessing you against a specific rubric identified or developed by you. The rubric(s) for this exercise are found elsewhere. They might come from your course expectations or be provided by the instructor. This exercise is not graded.

Your name (the person being assessed) __________________________________________Date___________________________________
Name of CF _______________________________________Location of course ________________________ School________________________
Rubric being used in this exercise._____________________________________________________________________________________
Rubric Value awarded to you as determined by your CF (Circle One):   1     2     3     4.

Procedure for Part One:
You report orally to your CF. Your CF evaluates the report using the rubric cited above as a guideline. Your CF may ask questions you. Upon completion of your report your CF evaluates your response consistent with the factors cited in the rubric. Finally the CF assigns a value to your  report consistent with the point structure cited in the rubric. The Rubric Value is recorded above. This completes Part One.
Procedure for Part Two:
The rubric listed below is used for this purpose. Now it is your opportunity to assess your CF  Do so by classifying his/her contribution in one of the categories listed below. In particular notice the category for a 4th point (Monica=s Rubric). Award Monica=s Rubric only when you feel that the assessment of you by your CF was exemplary and you are prepared to explain and defend your reasons for your decision.

CAUTION: Make this a valid exercise. If both you and tour CF intend to arbitrarily award each other the best possible score, skip the exercise as it has no value.

Activity
Zero Points
One Point
Two points
Three Points
Four Points: Monica=s Rubric

My assessment of my Critical Friend (CF).
Did not participate because ____________________________________
__________ __
Or, see Caution.
Exercise of limited value. My CF did not follow the guidelines for this exercise. My report was not critiqued. Questions asked of me focused on the Information and Comprehension. Observations made by my CF mostly reinforced my views.
Exercise had some value. Questions asked of me considered full range of Bloom=s six categories. Observations by my CF mostly laudatory.  I was not challenged to go beyond the content of my report. The exercise did cause me to reflect on how I communicate.
Exercise was valuable. Questions asked of me related to various categories of Bloom. My CF challenged me to think reflectively, creatively, meta cognitively. I was challenged to respond to the question: So what?
Critique of me by my CF exemplary. I am able to defend why I think so and I do that below.
My reasons for awarding Monica=s  Fourth Point  are:      ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Creedon/Ross Pompano Beach, FL Revised 11-03; for Bangkok 4–09

Behavior and Classroom Management[CRMB] Kuwait May 2009

December 18, 2009

Syllabus: Behavior and Classroom Management[CRMB]
Kuwait
May 2009
Lawrence P. Creedon, Instructor

Yahoo site: FraminghamKuwait
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/FraminghamKuwait

Creedon Web Site: Reflections on the Theory and Practice of Education
https://larrycreedon.wordpress.com/

Course Source Material
All Creedon monographs referenced in this syllabus can be found at http://www.larrycreedon.wordpress.com as well as on the Yahoo site: FraminghamKuwait.

Course Focus and Background:
This course will focus on classroom organization, management and learner behavior. It will:
1. Be offered in conjunction with the course: English as a Second Language [ESL]
2. Identify learner behavior/discipline as one aspect of classroom management.
3. Adhere to a constructivist approach in course presentation. Constructivism as defined and applied in this course is laid out in the Creedon monograph: Constructivism – Theory, Characteristics and So What. If  practical and aavailable, SKYPE sessions will be included in the pre course component of the course.
4. The course will proceed from theory into practice. A consideration of theory will begin with examining the basic nature of humanity and will include the current findings of brain research as it relates to learning. In the area of practice it will examine several recognized approaches to classroom management and the relationship of each to student behavior.
7.    Assessment and grades will be determined by Rubrics. Rubrics will be presented by  Creedon as well as developed by each individual participant. Rubrics as defined and applied in the course are laid out in the Creedon monograph: Rubrics: Characteristics, Categories, Features, Applications, and. Action Research related to course content will be a major component of the course. Action Research as defined and applied is found in the Creedon monograph:“A Constructivist Approach to Action Research.”

Classroom Management and Student Behavior
Every practitioner has an approach to classroom management and student behavior. However, the terms are not synonymous. Behavior is a component of classroom management.  It is generally believed that the more learner-centered and effective classroom management is, fewer will be the instances of disruptive student behavior. We will examine that belief.

In this course we will consider the extent to which your approach to classroom management system is guided by:
1. Your view related to the basic nature of humankind. Are human beings [including children] inherently good, bad or neutral?  Is the behavioral nature of children inherently active, passive or neutral?  See Bigge: Learning Theories for Teachers Also, the Creedon monographs Prerequisites to a Focus on Behavior and Classroom Management, and Learning Theory, Classroom Management and Behavior. .
2.    Your understanding and application of principles of learning. See the Creedon
monographs: Four Questions in the Pursuit of Excellence in Education. Also Classroom Management –  Five Approaches to Student..
3.    Your past practice and the application or absence of a theory based approach. See the Creedon monographs: Classroom Management and Five Approaches to Student Behavior. Also: Philosophy of Education and Teaching Practice.  .
4. A potpourri of random “whatever works” tactics.
5. Requirements mandated by school authorities.

Pedagogy
This course will:
1. Follow a constructivist approach. See the Creedon monographs: Constructivism –Theory, Application and So What. Also: Curriculum Development, a Design for
Learning, Classroom Management, and Student Behavior.
2. Function collaboratively with the Helen Ross facilitated ESL course
3. Participants will be actively involved in recommending the content, pedagogy, management and assessment of the course.
4. Apply Benjamin Bloom’s Six Category Cognitive Domain Taxonomy as a process vehicle for course exercises and activities. See the Creedon monograph: Bloom’s Cognitive Taxonomy – Domains, Modifications and Applications.
5. If SKYPE is available and it is practical several pre course SKYPE sessions might be held.
6. Involve extensive peer leadership as well as group and team activities.  See Creedon/Ross monograph: Cooperative Groups and Collaborative Teams –
Definition, Distinction and Application. Also handouts describing peer leadership responsibilities. These will be found on FraminghamKuwait.
7. Engage in an Action Research project.  See the Creedon monograph: A
Constructivist Approach to Action Research.
Instructional and Performance Objectives
Objectives ought to be clear and distinct. The verbs and key terms presented in bold type for each of the objectives listed below are consistent with Bloom’s cognitive taxonomy. The verbs indicate what action and/or behavior is expected of the learner. It is from these objectives that course assessment exercises and activities will be developed. Assessment and testing are not synonymous. In Revealing Minds [2008] author Craig Pohlman defined assessment as an appraisal or evaluation in order to develop a deeper understanding of a situation or learner. Whereas a test is to determine a level of understanding or application of content.

Instructional and Performance objectives are not the same thing. Instructional Objectives indicate what the instructor plans to do and can be held accountable for doing. Performance Objectives indicate what the leaner is to do in response to what the instructor does.  Final grades will be determined by rubrics. Rubrics will be developed by both the instructor and students. A tutorial on how to write rubrics will be held. See the Creedon monograph: Rubrics – Characteristics, Categories, Features Applications, and Cautions.

Cited below are Instructional Objectives for the CRMB course. Note that in each objective key words and phrases appear in bold as well as in italics and underlined. This directs attention directly to what action is being proposed in the objective. A review of the words and phrases in bold, italics and underlined reveal the Bloom based cognitive level of the objective. In addition to serving as a component of the course syllabus, the instructional objectives can be a source of an assessment exercise. The instructor and the students can determine the Bloom based cognitive level of the course by relating the terms in bold to Bloom’s six categories. Objectives are written consistent with the approach of Robert Mager: Preparing Instructional Objectives [1962]. According to Mager instructional objectives consider such questions as:
What is it that we must teach?
How will we know when we have taught it?
What materials and procedures will work best to teach what we wish to teach?

Instructional Objectives
1. The Instructor will provide each participant with a series of on line pre course exercises. The exercises, including instructions indicating how to complete the exercises, can be accessed through FraminghamKuwait..
2. The Instructors in both the Classroom Management and Behavior as well as the English as a Second Language courses will engage participants in joint exercises involving both courses.
3. Through direct instruction, the instructor will share with participants professionally recognized alternative understandings and approaches to Classroom Management and Student Behavior. Several are cited on FraminghamKuwait. See Tauber’s book on Classroom Management  — Sound Theory, Effective Practice where five approaches are considered.
4. In an instructor facilitated group process, the instructor will engage participants in an exercise where they will define, as well as compare and contrast, their understanding of the terms classroom management and behavior.
5. Through direct instructor and well as student peer instruction, participants will engage in a tutorial on how to write Bloom based rubrics.
6. Through direct instruction, the instructor will share with participants his constructivist based point of view relative to the role practitioners play in developing a comprehensive program of classroom management and behavior.
7. In instructor facilitated group processes, the instructor will engage participants in an exercise where they will examine the six approaches to classroom management and behavior identified by Tauber as well as the brain research findings of Medina, Levine  and Pohlman.
8. Through instructor facilitated group processes, the instructor will engage participants in examining the impact of alternative philosophical and psychological forces in determining various approaches to classroom management and student behavior.
9. In instructor facilitated group processes, the instructor will engage participants in considering, as well as comparing and contrasting, alternative approaches to classroom management and student behavior.
10. Through direct instruction, the instructor will introduce participants to a ten component design for learning: The Student Centered Learning System (SCLS). See the Creedon monograph.
11. In instructor facilitated group processes, the instructor will engage participants in an exercise where they will compare and contrast, synthesize, and evaluate alternative approaches to classroom management and student behavior to the ten component design for learning: SCLS.
12. In instructor facilitated teams, the instructor will engage participant teams in the development of an approach to classroom management and student behavior that is based on sound theory and “Fit-for-Use” in their practice.
13.  Applying the Creedon monograph on A Constructivist Approach to Action Research the instructor will facilitate teams of course members in Action Research projects related to classroom management and student behavior and/or the impact of CM on second language learners.
14. The instructor will promote FraminghmKuwait as a vehicle for continuing professional development among class members.
Performance Objectives
Performance objectives indicate what the learner is expected to do. Competence is the intended outcome. Competence is defined consistent with that of Jay Hall in The Competence Process [1980]. What needs to be done is stipulated by the verb [action word(s)] found in italics and underlined in each objective. The first time each action word or key term is used it is defined directly below the objective.
1. Applying the pedagogical strategies previously cited, critique the four approaches to CM cited by Tauber in Classroom Management – Sound Theory and Effective Practice.
Apply: To put into action or use
Critique: Evaluative and subject to critical discourse
Critical: Characterized by careful and exact evaluation
2. As an end-in-view [JohnDewey] work toward generating an approach to CM for your practice that is rational and defensible.
Generate: To bring an idea into existence
Rational: Consistent with reason and intellect
Defensible: Capable of being justified.
3. Given a series of pre course exercises, answer each exercise consistent with the requirements cited in the course syllabus. The handout describing pre course exercises has been already provided to you.
Answer: To act in response to meeting a requirement
Requirement: Something asked for
Describe: To give a verbal account
4. Given handouts with each one describing aspects of CM from an author’s point of view, or referencing the articles you read as a pre course exercise, and as a member of a group, critique the information contained in your handout or from your choice of articles. In your critique apply Bloom’s six cognitive categories. Be prepared to explain your views to classmates from other groups.
Information: Data about a specific subject or situation
Explain: Make understandable
5 .Given the bok: Tauber, Classroom Management – Theory and Effective Practice, 3rd edition, describe the components of each of the six models cited by Tauber and summarized in the Creedon monograph:  Classroom Management – Five Approaches to Student Behavior.  Apply to your practice each of the six approaches.

6. Having developed your own concept of CM in a pre course exercise be prepared to explain it, cite examples of it and indicate how you would apply it in your practice.
Developed: To bring into being
Prepared: To be ready
Example: Representative
7. Given what you perceive and understand about the approach to CM at your school and using Bloom, critique your perception and understanding of what is practiced in your school against the six alternative models cited by Tauber.
Perceive: Intuitively aware
Understand: To perceive and recognize the meaning
8. Given the Creedon monograph on action research engage in an action research project resulting in a plan of action for the issue you have identified.
Engage: What one intends to do or achieve
9. Given a concern of inclusion and learning style as factors in coming to know relate them to CM.
Relate: To be united in a relationship
10. Using Bloom’s taxonomy as a guide relate the 12 Brain Rules cited by Medina in Brain Rules [2008] to your practice. Your first response to this exercise will be as a pre course activity. Your second response will follow s consideration of the 12 in class. Ultimately you will be called upon apply Bloom’s taxonomy in reviewing both exercises and relating them to your practice.
11. Given the Creedon  monograph on Four Questions as a Foundation for Excellence in Education  relate each question to CM and to your practice.

Learning Material
The learning materials for the course are primarily monographs written by Creedon. In addition they include material from other sources related to classroom management and behavior. The learning material is divided into three categories: Primary, Secondary, and Supportive.

Primary Reading: Creedon monographs are required pre course reading. In that time in class is limited they are to be studied before class begins. Do not assume that they will be “taught” in class. However, they will be used frequently in class therefore you will need to have ready access to them in class either in printed form or through your personal laptop.

They are found between FraminghamKuwait as well as the Creedon web site: Reflections of the Theory and Practice of Education – https://larrycreedon.wordpress.com

Secondary Reading: These include Creedon monographs that provide additional information. They will be referred to in class and once again due to time constraints and course focus class time will not be given over to a consider of them. However, you will need to be familiar with them and have in class access to them.

Supportive Material: In this category will be articles from the periodic literature, surveys and questionnaires, and outlines of several well established commercial approaches to classroom management and behavior.

On-Line, Pre-On-Site Requirements
The On Line, Pre On Site requirements and activities for the course are cited in a separate section on FraminghamKuwait. They will include several exercises for you to complete before we come together on site. You are to complete each exercise and return it to Creedon at lpcreedon@aol.com or at lpcreedon@gmail.com by September 22, 2008..

Post On-Line Exercise
You will engage in an Action Research project with a small cohort of classmates. The process is laid out in the Creedon monograph: A Constructivist Approach to Action Research. You will begin this exercise during the course. It may become necessary to complete it post course. If so your completed Action Research project will be forwarded to Creedon at lpcreedon@aol.com or lpcreedon@gmail.com. Also it will be uploaded to FraminghamKuwait.

Assessment – Final Grade
Rubrics will be utilized for assessment and final grade. Rubrics will be developed consistent with the instructional and performance objectives of the course. Rubrics will be developed by the instructor as well as by you. See the Creedon monograph: Rubrics: Characteristics, Categories, Features, Applications, and Cautions.

Ipse dixit
Lawrence P. Creedon
Kuwait
May 2009.

Curriculum Theory and Practice, Katowice, Poland 2005

December 18, 2009

1
Syllabus
84.925: Curriculum Theory and Practice
Katowice, Poland, 2005
Purposes and Goals
The purposes and goals of this course are to:
1. Identify what course participants understand to be the meaning of
the terms curriculum and instruction.
2. Consider how each participant in the course applies the concepts of
curriculum and instruction in their individual practice.
3. Consider the theoretical and the practical basis of curriculum and
instruction where each participant practices.
4. Introduce participants to recognized professional and scholarly
concepts related to curriculum and instruction and their application.
5. Distinguish between curriculum and instruction.
6. Assert that practitioners are seldom trained as curriculum developers;
however, it is common that they are called upon to function as such.
7. Assert that instruction is the forte of practitioners and that they must
rise to the level of experts.
8. Consider the four questions of:
a. What is knowledge?
b. How to young people come to know?
c. How to organize a program consistent with a and b above.
d. How to implement the program organized.
9. Consider alternative philosophical and psychological foundations
upon which the concepts of curriculum and instruction are based.
10. Compare and contrast real life approaches to curriculum and
instruction.
11. Introduce a ten component Student Centered Design for Learning.
12. Provide an opportunity for participants to structure an approach to
curriculum development and instructional implementation that is “Fitfor-
Use” in their practice.
13. Provide an opportunity for participants to engage in an action
research project related to curriculum development and instructional
implementation.
14. Implement an Internet Yahoo based interactive network available to
all participants as a tool for personal and collective professional
development.
2
A Constructivist Approach
Practice not based on theory is reckless.
Theory not applied in worthless.
Creedon
In theory and in practice, this course will be an example of a constructivist
approach to learning. For an understanding of a constructivist approach see
the Creedon monograph: Constructivism: Theory, Characteristics, and So
What? Found on: FraminghamKatowice.
Core Reading Material for the Course
People seldom read the books they talk about
Revel
Found on FraminghamKatowice are approximately 20 Creedon written
monographs applicable to this course. For the purposes of this course, they
fall into several categories. Those that are:
1. Reading Essential It is a course requirement that you provide
yourself with hard copies of each, be thoroughly familiar with the
content of each and bring them all to class each day. They are the
monographs on:
Four Questions for the Pursuit of Excellence in Education
Constructivism, Theory, Characteristics and So What
Bloom: Principles, Modifications and Application
Foundations, Pathways and Platform
Brainstorming Revised 2000, or Pathway, Platform and Action
Research
Curriculum and Instruction
A Student Centered Learning System
2. Necessary that you read them and are able to retrieve them when
called upon to do so.
3. Resource guides and references to be used by you when they are
applicable to what is going on in class.
3
Course Instructional and Performance Objectives.
Instructional and Performance objectives are not the same thing.
Instructional Objectives indicate what the instructor plans to do and can
be held accountable for doing. Performance Objectives indicate what the
leaner is to do in response to what the instructor does. Assessment
(grades) is determined by rubrics. Rubrics are written by both the
instructor and the students. A tutorial on how to write rubrics will be
held.
Cited below are Instructional Objectives for the Curriculum course. Note
that in each objective key words and phrases appear in bold as well as in
italics and underlined. This directs attention directly to what action is
being proposed in the objective. A review of the words and phrases in
bold, italics and underlined reveal the Bloom based cognitive level of
the course. In addition to serving as the syllabus for the course, it is an
exercise in self-assessment. Both the instructor and the students can
determine the Bloom based cognitive level of the course by relating the
terms in bold to Bloom’s six category cognitive taxonomy. Objectives
are written consistent with the approach of Robert Mager.
Instructional Objectives
1. The Instructor will provide each participant with a series of precourse
exercises. The exercises, including instructions indicating how to
complete the exercises, will be accessed through FraminghamKatowice.
2. Through direct instruction, the instructor will share with participants
professionally recognized alternative understandings and approaches to
curriculum and instruction.
3. In an instructor facilitated group process, the instructor will engage
participants in an exercise where they will define, as well as compare
and contrast, their understanding of the terms curriculum and
instruction.
4. Through direct instructor and well as student peer instruction,
participants will engage in a tutorial on how to write Bloom based
rubrics.
4
5. Through direct instruction, the instructor will share with participants
his point of view relative to the role practitioners play in curriculum
development and instructional implementation.
6. In instructor facilitated group processes, the instructor will engage
participants in an exercise where they will examine the questions of: 1.
What is Knowledge? and 2. How do young people come to know?
7. Through instructor facilitated group processes, the instructor will
engage participants in examining the impact of alternative philosophical
and psychological forces in determining various approaches to
curriculum and instruction.
8. In instructor facilitated group processes, the instructor will engage
participants in considering, as well as comparing and contrasting,
alternative approaches to curriculum development and the application
of each
9. Through direct instruction, the instructor will introduce participants to
a ten component design for learning: The Student Centered Learning
System (SCLS). .
10. In instructor facilitated group processes, the instructor will engage
participants in an exercise where they will compare and contrast,
synthesize, and evaluate alternative approaches to curriculum
development and instructional implementation to the ten component
design for learning: SCLS.
11. In instructor facilitated teams, the instructor will engage participant
teams in the development of an approach to curriculum and instruction
that is based on sound theory and “Fit-for-Use” in their practicing the
instructor provided Creedon monograph on Action Research, the
instructor will facilitate teams of course members in Action Research
projects related to curriculum development or instructional
implementation.
12. The instructor will promote FraminghmKatowice as a vehicle for
continuing professional development among class members.
13. In instructor facilitated group processes, the instructor will engage
participants in an exercise where they will compare and contrast,
synthesize, and evaluate alternative approaches to curriculum
development and instructional implementation to the ten component
design for learning: SCLS.
14. In instructor facilitated teams, the instructor will engage participant
teams in the development of an approach to curriculum and instruction
that is based on sound theory and “Fit-for-Use” in their practice.
5
15. Using the instructor provided Creedon monograph on Action Research,
the instructor will facilitate teams of course members in Action
Research projects related to curriculum development or instructional
implementation.
16. The instructor will promote FraminghmKatowice as a vehicle for
continuing professional development among class members.
Student Performance Objectives
Cited below are the performance objectives for this course. Note that in
each objective key words and phrases appear in bold as well as in italics
and underlined. This directs attention directly to what action is being
proposed in the objective. A review of the words and phrases in bold, italics
and underlined reveal the Bloom based cognitive level of the course. In
addition to serving as the syllabus for the course, the document provides an
exercise in self-assessment. Focusing on the terms in bold identifies the level
of cognition that is being stressed in the course. Objectives are written
consistent with the approach of Robert Mager.
1. Consistent with instructions provided over FraminghamKatowice,
participants will engage in a series of precourse exercises.
2. Once class begins, and consistent with instructions provided over
FraminghamKatowice as well as orally by the instructor, students will
engage in a series of interactive small group activities related to the
precourse exercises.
3. Using the six categories of Bloom’s cognitive taxonomy as a guide,
students will engage in interactive small group activities where they
will define, as well as compare and contrast, their understanding of the
terms curriculum and instruction.
4. Using the six categories of Bloom’s cognitive taxonomy as a guide,
students, who feel the need and on a volunteer basis, will participate in
a tutorial on how to write Bloom based rubrics.
5. Under student leadership identified as “The Agenda Committee” (AC),
all participants will be informed as to how they will participate actively
in determining course content, pedagogy, assessment and management.
6. Under the leadership of the AC, participants in small interactive groups
will engage in a Bloom based exercise focused on the questions of: 1.
What is knowledge? 2. How do young people come to know?
7. As the result of direct instructor input, participants will be informed as to
a several approaches to curriculum and instruction. Theories considered
6
will include Essentialism (Traditional), Perennialism, Realism,
Behaviorism and Progressivism (Constructivist).
8. Under leadership of the AC, participants in small groups will engage in
a Bloom based exercise where they will analyze, compare and contrast,
synthesize, and evaluate the alternative approaches to curriculum and
instruction identified by the instructor.
9. In response to direct instructor input, participants will be informed as to
the difference between groups and teams.
10. In response to direct instructor input, participants will be informed as to a
ten component Student Centered Design for Learning (SCLS).
11. Under leadership of the AC, participants in small groups will reflect on
the components of the SCLS as they apply to their own practice. They
will identify areas where they could act to implement components of the
SCLS in their own practice.
12. In response to direct instructor input, participants will be informed as to
the major principles of authorities in the field of curriculum and
instruction such as Montessori, Piaget, Tyler, Bloom, Bruner, Skinner,
Gagne, Hirsch, Gardner, Goleman and Levine.
13. Under the leadership of the AC, participants will engage in a Bloom
based exercise where they will consider all six categories of Bloom in
relationship to the authorities cited in Performance Objective 12.
14. Under leadership of the AC, participants in small teams will develop a
plan of action for applying the approach to curriculum and instruction
that they feel in most compatible with their own view.
15. Using the Creedon monograph on Action Research, participants in small
teams will engage in an Action Research project.
16. Under the leadership of the AC, participants will consider and propose
a plan of action for keeping FraminghamKatowice active as a tool for
professional development.
Assessment: Rubrics/Grades
Assessment and grades for the course will be done in as rubrics. Rubrics will
be written by both the instructor and participants. Rubrics ought to be
prepared at the same time as instructor and performance objectives are
written. For those not familiar with how to write a Bloom based rubric a
tutorial will be provided. Assessment using rubrics, will be done by the
instructor, peers and each participant. On FraminghamKatowice, there is a
FOLDER dedicated to rubrics. Please consult it for additional information
and examples.
7
Participant Involvement in Determining Course Content, Pedagogy and
Management.
Consistent with a constructivist approach there will be extensive participant
involvement in determining course content, pedagogy and management.
This will take place under the leadership of a team of participants identified
as “The Agenda Committee.”
Day by Day Schedule
Instructional Objective Day
1 1
2 and 3 2
4 and 5 3
Mid Term Experience
6 and 7 4
8 and 9 5 and 6
11 7 and 8
10 9
12 10
Final

Curriculum Theory and Practice, Seoul, Korea December 2008

December 18, 2009

1
Syllabus
84.925: Curriculum Theory and Practice
Seoul, Korea December 2008
Purposes and Goals
The purposes and goals of this course are to:
1. Identify what course participants understand to be the meaning of
the terms curriculum and instruction.
2. Consider how each participant in the course applies the concepts of
curriculum and instruction in their individual practice.
3. Consider the theoretical and the practical basis of curriculum and
instruction where each participant practices.
4. Introduce participants to recognized professional and scholarly
concepts related to curriculum and instruction and their application
such as:
a. Brain research
b. Benjamin Bloom’s Six Category Cognitive Taxonomy as an
organizing concept.
5. Distinguish between curriculum and instruction.
6. Assert that practitioners are seldom trained as curriculum developers;
however, it is common that they are called upon to function as such.
7. Assert that instruction is the forte of practitioners and that they must
rise to the level of experts.
8. Consider the four questions of:
a. What is knowledge?
b. How to young people come to know?
c. How to organize a program consistent with a and b above.
d. How to implement the program organized.
9. Consider alternative philosophical and psychological foundations
upon which the concepts of curriculum and instruction are based.
10. Compare and contrast real life approaches to curriculum and
instruction.
11. Introduce a ten component Student Centered Design for Learning.
12. Provide an opportunity for participants to structure an approach to
curriculum development and instructional implementation that is “Fitfor-
Use” in their practice.
2
13. Provide an opportunity for participants to engage in an action
research project related to curriculum development and instructional
implementation.
14. Implement an Internet Yahoo based interactive network available to
all participants as a tool for personal and collective professional
development.
A Constructivist Approach
Practice not based on theory is reckless.
Theory not applied in worthless.
Creedon
In theory and in practice, this course will be an example of a constructivist
approach to learning. For an understanding of a constructivist approach see
the Creedon monograph: Constructivism: Theory, Characteristics, and So
What? Found on: FraminghamKorea08 [FK08].
Learning Material for the Course
People seldom read the books they talk about
Revel
Found on FraminghamKorea08 [FK08] are several monographs authored by
Creedon that applicable to this course. They fall into the following
categories:
1. Learning Materials Primary: It is a course requirement that you be
totally familiar with each of the following and that you have available
in class hard copies of each. Be thoroughly familiar with the content
of each and bring them all to class each day. They are the monographs
on:
•Four Questions for the Pursuit of Excellence in Education
Theory, Characteristics and So What
•Bloom: Principles, Modifications and Application
•Foundations, Pathways and Platform
•Revised 2000, or Pathway, Platform and Action Brainstorming
Research
Curriculum and Instruction: Not the Same
•A Student Centered Learning System
2. Learning Material Supportive: You will need to be familiar with
these as the occasion presents itself in class. You do not need to
3
download these ahead of time and have hard copies available;
however, you will need access to them as the occasion requires.
These are found on FS08 in the “Folder” designated “Learning
materials Supportive.”
.
3. Learning Material Other: Here you will find articles from other
sources such as journals and the Internet. You will be directed to
these as the occasion presents itself. You do not need to download
these ahead of timer or have hard copies available.
Course Instructional and Performance Objectives.
Instructional and Performance objectives are not the same thing.
Instructional Objectives indicate what the instructor plans to do and can
be held accountable for doing. Performance Objectives indicate what the
leaner is to do in response to what the instructor does. Assessment
[grade] is determined by rubrics. Rubrics are written by both the
instructor and the students. A tutorial on how to write rubrics will be
held.
Cited below are the Instructional Objectives for the Curriculum course.
Note that in each objective key words and phrases appear in bold as well
as in italics and underlined. This directs attention directly to what action
is being proposed in the objective. A review of the words and phrases in
bold, italics and underlined reveal the Bloom based cognitive level of
the course. In addition to serving as the syllabus for the course, it is an
exercise in self-assessment. Both the instructor and the students can
determine the Bloom based cognitive level of the course by relating the
terms in bold to Bloom’s six category cognitive taxonomy. Objectives
are written consistent with the approach of Robert Mager.
Instructional Objectives
1. The Instructor will provide each participant with a series of precourse
exercises. The exercises, including instructions indicating how to
complete each exercise is found on FraminghamKoroea08.
2. Through direct instruction, the instructor will share with participants
alternative understandings and approaches to curriculum and
instruction.
4
3. In an instructor facilitated group process, the instructor will engage
participants in an exercise where they will define as well as compare
and contrast their understanding of the terms curriculum and
instruction.
4. Through direct instructor and well as participant peer instruction,
participants will engage in a tutorial on how to write Bloom based
rubrics.
5. Through direct instruction, the instructor will share with participants
his point of view relative to the role practitioners play in curriculum
development and instructional implementation.
6. In instructor facilitated group processes, the instructor will engage
participants in an exercise where they will examine the questions of:
a. What is Knowledge?
b. How do young people come to know?
7. Through instructor facilitated group processes, the instructor will
engage participants in examining the impact of alternative philosophical
and psychological forces in determining various approaches to
curriculum and instruction.
8. In instructor facilitated group processes, the instructor will engage
participants in considering, as well as comparing and contrasting,
alternative approaches to curriculum development and the application
of each.
9. Through direct instruction, the instructor will introduce participants to
a ten component design for learning: The Student Centered Learning
System [SCLS].
10. In instructor facilitated group processes, the instructor will engage
participants in an exercise where they will compare and contrast,
synthesize, and evaluate alternative approaches to curriculum
development and instructional implementation to the ten component
design for learning: SCLS.
11. In instructor facilitated and participant developed interactive group
presentation consideration will be given to the impact of brain research
on curriculum and instruction.
12. In instructor facilitated teams, the instructor will engage participant
teams in the development of an approach to curriculum and instruction
that is based on sound theory and “Fit-for-Use” in their practicing the
instructor provided Creedon monograph on Action Research, the
instructor will facilitate teams of course members in Action Research
projects related to curriculum development or instructional
implementation.
5
13. The instructor will promote FraminghmKorea08 as a vehicle for
continuing professional development among class members.
14. In instructor facilitated group processes, the instructor will engage
participants in an exercise where they will compare and contrast,
synthesize, and evaluate alternative approaches to curriculum
development and instructional implementation to the ten component
design for learning: SCLS.
15. In instructor facilitated teams, the instructor will engage participant
teams in the development of an approach to curriculum and instruction
that is based on sound theory and “Fit-for-Use” in their practice.
16. Using the instructor provided Creedon monograph on Action Research,
the instructor will facilitate teams of course members in Action
Research projects related to curriculum development or instructional
implementation.
17. The instructor will promote FraminghmKorea08 as a vehicle for
continuing professional development among class members.
Student Performance Objectives
Cited below are the performance objectives for this course. Note that in
each objective key words and phrases appear in bold as well as in italics
and underlined. This directs attention directly to what action is being
proposed in the objective. A review of the words and phrases in bold, italics
and underlined reveal the Bloom based cognitive level of the course. In
addition to serving as the syllabus for the course, the document provides an
exercise in self-assessment. Focusing on the terms in bold identifies the level
of cognition that is being stressed in the course. Objectives are written
consistent with the approach of Robert Mager.
1. Consistent with instructions provided over FraminghamKorea08,
participants will engage in a series of precourse exercises. Most of the
participant completed exercises will be forwarded to Creedon via
lpcreedon@aol.com or lpcreedon@gmail.com. Creedon will respond to
each prior to the beginning of the on site component of the course. From
participant comments in their pre course exercises special assignments
will be directed to individuals. The special assignments will call for
research on the part of those assigned and the development of a
participant involved and interactive presentation in class. Not all
participants will receive a special assignment. This is a key component of
the course.
6
2. Once class begins, and consistent with instructions provided over
FraminghamKorea08 as well as orally by the instructor, students will
engage in a series of participant led interactive small group activities
related to the precourse exercises.
3. Using the six categories of Bloom’s cognitive taxonomy as a guide,
students will engage in interactive small group activities where they
will define, as well as compare and contrast, their understanding of the
terms curriculum and instruction.
4. Using the six categories of Bloom’s cognitive taxonomy as a guide,
students, who feel the need and on a volunteer basis, will participate in
a tutorial on how to write Bloom based rubrics.
5. Under student leadership identified as “The Facilitation Committee”
[FC], all participants will be informed as to how they will participate
actively in determining course content, pedagogy, assessment and
management.
6. Under the leadership of the FC, participants in small interactive groups
will engage in a Bloom based exercise focused on the questions of:
a. What is knowledge?
b. How do young people come to know?
7. As the result of direct instructor input, participants will be informed as to
several approaches to curriculum and instruction. Theories considered
will include Essentialism [Traditional], Perennialism, Realism,
Behaviorism and Progressivism [Constructivist].
8. Under leadership of the FC, participants in small groups will engage in a
Bloom based exercise where they will analyze, compare and contrast,
synthesize, and evaluate the alternative approaches to curriculum and
instruction identified by the instructor.
9. In response to direct instructor input, participants will be informed as to
the difference between groups and teams.
10. In response to direct instructor input, participants will be informed as to a
ten component Student Centered Design for Learning [SCLS].
11. Under leadership of the FC, participants in small groups will reflect on
the components of the SCLS as they apply to their own practice. They
will identify areas where they could act to implement components of the
SCLS in their own practice.
12. In response to direct instructor input, participants will be informed as to
the major principles of authorities in the field of curriculum and
instruction such as Montessori, Piaget, Tyler, Bloom, Bruner, Skinner,
Gagne, Hirsch, Gardner, Goleman and Levine.
7
13. Under the leadership of the FC, participants will engage in a Bloom
based exercise where they will consider all six categories of Bloom in
relationship to the authorities cited in Performance Objective 12.
14. Under leadership of the FC, participants in small teams will develop a
plan of action for applying the approach to curriculum and instruction
that they feel in most compatible with their own view.
15. Using the Creedon monograph on Action Research, participants in small
teams will engage in an Action Research project.
16. Under the leadership of the FC, participants will consider and propose a
plan of action for keeping FraminghamKorea08 active as a tool for
professional development.
Assessment: Rubrics/Grades
Rubrics will be utilized to in determing course assessment and individual
grades. Rubrics will be developed by both the instructor and participants.
Rubrics ought to be prepared at the same time as instructor and performance
objectives are written. For those not familiar with how to write a Bloom
based rubric a tutorial will be provided. Assessment using rubrics, will be
done by the instructor, peers and each participant. On FraminghamKorea08,
there is a FOLDER dedicated to Rubrics. Please consult it for additional
information and examples.
Participant Involvement in Determining Course Content, Pedagogy and
Management.
Consistent with a constructivist approach there will be extensive participant
involvement in determining course content, pedagogy and management.
This will take place under the leadership of a team of participants identified
as “The Facilitation Committee.”
Day by Day Schedule
To be announced later.
Ipse dixit!
Larry Creedon
http://www.larrycreedon.wordpress.com
For Korea, December 2008.

Research/Evaluation On Line, Casablanca, Morocco

December 18, 2009

1
Research/Evaluation On Line
Casablanca, Morocco
Syllabus
Introduction
This course will be offered On Line. In learning theory and pedagogy, it will follow a constructivist approach. The identifying
characteristics of a constructivist approach to learning are cited as Appendix A to this syllabus.
Objectives
Two lists of objectives are cited here. They are those that relate to the instructor and those that relate to you, the learners.
Instructor Objectives:
1. Facilitate with participants a consideration of the topic of research and evaluation in education.
2. Provide for an On Line learning environment and process that is consistent with a constructivist approach to learning.
3. Facilitate with participants a consideration of several concepts, terms and methods related to research and evaluation in
education.
4. Facilitate participant involvement in conducting research into either instructor identified issues, or to those issues
identified by individuals as well as small teams of participants.
Learner Objectives:
1. You will commit at least 40 clock hours to fulfilling the requirements of this course
2. Given an instructor provided list of topics and concerns common to research, in pairs you and a partner will research at
least three of the topics listed. You will Post your findings of FraminghamOnLineCasa and be prepared to engage in On
Line chat activity about your research with course colleagues. You will use one of the two research guides cited below in
conducting your research. They are either Creedon’s Approach to Action Research or Bloom’s Six Category Cognitive
Domain Taxonomy.
3. Given an instructor provided list of suggested research topics or identifying an issue of your own choosing, each
participant working independently will engage in research related to the topic of your choice..
4. You will develop a set of personal rubrics by which you will hold yourself accountable for personal achievement in the
course. Bloom’s cognitive taxonomy will be followed in developing the rubrics. Examples of Bloom based rubrics are
cited in Appendix B.
Course Grade
Your grade in the course will be accomplished in response to:
1. Completing all research assignments cited above
2. Evidence that you have followed one of the two research guides cited above.
3. Your participation in all On Line activities in the course as well as on site discussion sessions.
4. Your personal set of course expectations and the extent to which they have been met.
5. Your personal set of rubrics by which you will hold yourself accountable for course content.
Pre Course Assignments: Course Expectations and Personal Rubrics
Before the course begins you are to complete two assignments. Forward each of these ASAP to lpcreedon@aol.com.
1. Develop a personal set of expectations for the course. Forward them at least 07 days before the course begins to the
instructor via personal e mail: lpcreedon@aol.com
2. Develop a personal set of rubrics that will be used by you to hold yourself accountable for performing at the graduate
level in the course. Forward them at least 07 days before the course begins to the instructor at :lpcreedon@aol.com. Your
rubrics are to follow the six categories in Bloom’s cognitive taxonomy. Appendix B is a listing of Bloom based rubrics
developed for other Creedon courses. Use them as a guide.
On Line Interactive Access
On Line Interactive Access will be maintained throughout the course by utilizing:
1. FraminghamOnLineCasa XXXXXXXXXXX. This Yahoo based site has been established specifically for this course as
well as the On Line Issues course. All participants must be affiliated with Framingham OnLineCasa.
2. The personal e mail account of each participant.
3. Creedon e mail account is: lpcreedon.com
4. Creedon’s website: http://www.larrycreedon.info.
Focus of Course: Conducting Research and Sharing Findings
The course will feature small group and individual research on matters related to research and evaluation. All research findings
will be shared with the entire cohort by being posted on FraminghamOn Line Casa. Interaction will take place as participants will
2
be required to comment on the research and findings conducted by course colleagues. Sharing and comments will be posted on
FraminghamOnLineCasa for all to read and benefit from.
Two Research Categories
Course participants will participate in two categories of research.
Category 1. Cited below is a listing of Questions Common for All. Participants, in pairs, will conduct research on at least three of
these questions and post their findings on FraminghamOnLineCasa. An effort should be made to have each of the questions cited
below considered; however, that is not an absolute requirement. More than one pair of participants can consider the same question.
There is research value in having the same, or a similar question, examined by different pairs of participants.
Category 2. From the list of possible topics cited below, each participant will engage in individual research on one of the topics. If
you do not find a topic of interest to you from the list cited below, then you are free to select your own topic. However, if you
choose to select your own topic, you must have it approved by the instructor. In seeking approval from the instructor use your
personal e mail account for this purpose.
Interaction and Sharing
At least three procedures will be followed for sharing research findings with all participants:
1. All research will be Posted on FraminghamOnLineCasa. As a result it will available for all course participants to read,
study and comment on.
2. On site in Casablanca at specified times all participants under peer leadership will come together and engage in discussion
sessions related to the research conducted by colleagues. During these sessions Bloom’s Six Category Cognitive Domain
will be used as a discussion guide. At the conclusion of each discussion session a summary of the discussion will be
Posted on FraminghamOnLineCasa. Participants will volunteer for these tasks orgthe instructor will assign responsibility.
3. Using FraminghamOnLineCasa as the vehicle on line chat sessions will be undertaken. Bloom will be followed to guide
the discussion.
Topics: Common for All
Common For All
The issues cited immediately below will be considered by all participants working in pairs. One report from you and your
partner will be posted on FraminghamOnLine Casa. You and your partner are to consider at least three of the topics cited here.
The common topics are:
1. What is meant by the term “research in education?”
2. What are the characteristics of and standards for research?
3. How does research in education compare with that in other professions?
4. What is meant by the term “Selected Research?” Does it apply to education?
5. To what extent is the process of learning guided by research? Cite examples.
6. What is meant by “Qualitative and Quantitative” research? Cite examples.
7. What is meant by “Validity and Reliability?” Cite examples.
8. What are the different types of tests used in schools? Cite examples.
9. How many different kinds of research are there? Cite examples.
10. Relate the concept of intuition as considered in the book Blink by Malcolm Gladwell to education.
11. What is the history of the testing and research movement in education?
12. What do teachers need to know about educational research and statistics?
13. We practice our profession at a time when testing is center stage. It is expressed in grades being given to students, the
“College Boards,” the NCLB law, and others. What do scholars and commentators say about each of these. What does
research say? What do you say?
Suggested Individual Research Topics:
You are required to conduct individual research in one of the below cited areas, or to select a topic of your own choosing. You are
not obligated to choose one of the below. With the instructor’s approval you may research an issue of your choosing. If you choose
another topic:
1. Clearly identify the topic you wish to consider via personal e mail to lpcreedon@aol.com
2. Offer a statement of rationale for doing so.
3. Include your rubrics as to how you will hold yourself accountable.
4. Indicate the type of research you will be conducing and the research method you will follow
Suggested Topics: If you do not choose to select your own topic, choose one of these.
1. How do cultural differences influence learning?
2. Consider NCLB from a deconstructivist point of view (not constructivist, but deconstructivist). What doesn’t NCLB say
about learning? (Phi Delta Kappan. 3-04).
3. Advocates of NCLB, including the US Department of Education, assert that NCLB is based on research. What research is
being referenced? To what extent can the assertion be substantiated? What of the critics and criticism that claim NCLB is
based on selected research? Can that assertion be substantiated
3
4. For decades innovation in the practice of education has been cited as the cause of school failure. Can this assertion be
supported? (Creedon: “Innovation as the Cause of School Failure”).
5. What is meant by the term “Selected Research?” How can it be recognized? What are its effects? Cite examples.
6. Define, analyze, and compare and contrast research in education with that of other professions. Offer your evaluation and
make recommendations. Cite examples.
7. Consider several alternative approaches to second language learning. Use Bloom’s taxonomy as a procedural guide. Cite
examples.
8. To what extent has research in education affected the process of education and especially second language learning?
9. Compare and contrast the provisions of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of the 1960s with those of NCLB.
Include your opinion.
10. Design a research based program in teacher education for in-service professional development.
11. Make an extensive list of words and terms about education and learning used in the professional literature and verbal
discourse. Define each term, including if relevant, its contrasting and conflicting definitions. Render an opinion as to the
impact varying definitions have on the practice of education.
12. Classroom management and discipline is a reoccurring theme in education. Using Bloom’s taxonomy as a guide to
consider several alternatives. Include your opinion. (See Robert Tauber: Classroom Management).
13. In the United States opinion polls are a reality. To what extent are they used in education? To what extent do they
influence practice? To what extent ought they to influence practice?
15. Annually in September the Phi Delta Kappan publishes a report concerning the public’s attitude toward the public schools.
The report contains a section devoted to a statistical analysis of the findings. Develop a mini opinion poll based on the PDK model
and data, and conduct the survey among your classmates or other colleagues. Compare your finding with the PDK survey and Post
your findings on FraminghamOnLineCasa
16. In the past half century countless research studies have been conducted related to the public school. At least three have stood
the test of time. They are the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), the Colman Study, and A Nation at Risk.
Using Bloom’s cognitive taxonomy as a guide, consider these three studies. Consider them in relationship to their reliability and
validity, and as examples of qualitative and quantitative research. Render an opinion as to how much each has influenced public
education.
17. Many organizations conduct research in education and report their findings. Consider research done by the National Education
Association, the American Federation of Teachers, Phi Delta Kappa, the Association of Supervision and Curriculum Development,
and the American Educational Research Association. Using Bloom’s cognitive taxonomy as a guide, compare and contrast the
approach, validity and reliability of the research methodology used by each. In that this is a large task, a group of four people may
form the research team for this topic.
18. Malcolm Gladwell in his recent book Blink focuses on the frequently discredited use of intuition as a valid way in coming to
know. Conduct a search of the literature on this concept and report your findings. Include reference to how intuitive learning is
used, discouraged and/or applied in schools.
Research Guides
In conducting your research and in reporting your findings on FraminghamOnLine Casa you are required to use one of the two
research guides cited below.
1. The Creedon monograph on Action Research. You were provided with a copy of the monograph in our earlier course
together.
2. Bloom’s Six Category Cognitive Domain Taxonomy. You were provided with a copy of Bloom’s Six Category Cognitive
Taxonomy in our earlier course together.
Appendix A
Identifying Characteristics of Constructivism
Learning is student centered
Learning is an interactive process
Learning begins in doubt
Learning is the result of doing and undergoing experience
Learning is experience based
Discovery learning
Exploratory learning
Participatory decision making
The teacher as a facilitator of learning as opposed to a dispenser of knowledge
The characteristics of constructivism cited below are not comprehensive, but they do suggest major components of a constructivist
platform.
4
1. Learners construct their own knowledge beginning with what they already know, exploring what needs to be known next
and determining the quality and effectiveness of their pursuit through authentic assessment and application.
2. All learning begins in doubt about the validity of an idea. The goal of doubt is the restoration of belief. (Pierce, James).
3. Learning takes place in the personal zone of cognitive development between what is already known, what is not known
and what is desired to be known (Vygotsky).
4. Learning is achieved best through a socially interactive process (Dewey, Vygotsky).
5. Learning is best achieved when the undertaking is consistent with the stages of human development (Rousseau, Piaget).
6. Learning is an experience based process of inquiring, discovering, exploring, doing and undergoing (Dewey).
7. The process of coming to know is neither random nor eclectic, it has structure
(Bruner, Bloom).
8. Learning proceeds in spiraling fashion including laddering, scaffolding, weaving, and dialogism (Bruner, Rogoff).
9. Cognitive development occurs in a socio-cultural context – the social milieu of individual achievement and the interaction
between the learner and adults as well as his/her peers in culturally valued activities. (Riordan – Karlsson, p.18).
10 The interactive process in coming to know needs to be guided by structured cognitive and affective taxonomies (Bloom,
Krathwohl).
Reference: Creedon, Constructivism Theory and Application.
Appendix B
Examples of Bloom based rubrics. Many of these were developed by former students in courses with Creedon. Use these
rubrics as a guide in developing your own rubrics.
Examples of Three Types of Rubrics
Those Developed by Instructor, by You, and used in Peer Assessment
Below are three examples of rubrics used for different purposes: 1.Developed the by Instructor, 2 Developed By you or
3.Used in assessment by a peer.
The first and third examples are consistent with the six categories in Bloom=s cognitive taxonomy as modified by Creedon.
In the examples Bloom’s cognitive domain levels are identified by number. They are::
1 Information 4. Synthesis
2. Comprehension 5. Evaluation
3. Compare and Contrast 6. Application
The second example relates to a rubric used in assessment by a peer.
A four point scale is used in assessment. The fourth point indicates exemplary work. The meaning of exemplary must be
defined and defended by the person awarding it. The fourth point is named after Monica, a student from San Roberto
Institute in Monterrey, Mexico who suggested it.
An Example of Instructor Generated Rubrics B Consistent with Bloom
Activity No points One Point Two Points Three Points
1. Pre Course
Reading: Text,
monographs and
other material.
No evidence oft having read the
assigned material. No reference
to text, monographs or other or
materials in assignments, class
discussion, or interaction with
Limited understanding of
text or assigned materials in
written or oral assignments.
Mostly limited to Bloom
levels 1 and 2 Little at 3 to
Comprehension
adequate at Bloom
levels 1 and 2.
Limited at Bloom
Clear and distinct
critique at all six
levels of Bloom.
5
instructor 6. levels 3 to 6.
2. Creedon
Monograph(s).
Considered are:
_________________
No evidence of monograph(s)
having been read. No reference
to in class assignments,
discussion or interaction with
instructor.
Same as above
Same as above
Same as above
3.Learning Theory
1. Bloom
2. Constructivism
3. Tyler
4.____________
No indication of understanding
Bloom, Constructivism, Tyler,
or _____________________
(Circle as appropriate).
Same as above
Same as above
Same as above
An Example of Student Developed Rubric: Self Assessment B These rubrics DO NOT follow Bloom=s taxonomy.
No Points One Two Three
Four (Monica)
1. Familiarity with
text, monographs, or
other materials
I skimmed the
materials looking for
main ideas. I do not
have a clear
understanding of the
principles shared in the
materials. I did not
participate in class
discussion.
I read the materials by the
start of class. I was able to
discuss its content in class.
I made little effort to
consider Bloom levels 3-6.
I read the materials.
Consistent with Bloom I am
able to refer to the materials
in class discussion and in
responding to assignments.
I have studie
materials and
critique them
Bloom level
2. Explain concept of
Classroom
Management (CM) as
understood and
practiced by me.
I have no consistent or
identifiable approach to
CM.
My basic approach to CM
is: If it works do it. I do not
consider the rationale or
theory of the approach. I
Aborrow@ from successful
approaches used by
colleagues.
I try to be consistent in my
approach to CM. I am not
very familiar with various
approaches to CM. I try to
implement an approach to
CM known as:
_______________________
_______________________
_________________
I am familiar
variety of ap
CM. I am m
comfortable
to implemen
approach ide
as:________
__________
__________
3. Explain the extent
to which I provide for
the various Learning
Styles of my students.
For example, the
impact of Gardner or
Levine on my
practice.
I make no effort to
identify or respond to
the individual Learning
Styles of my students.
I am aware that students
have different Learning
Styles. I have no
theoretical understanding
of them beyond that shared
in professional
development activities.
I am well versed in the
understanding of learning
styles. I try to adapt my
teaching and Classroom
Management to the learning
styles of my learners.
I am a studen
learning theo
study of lear
is a compone
personal pro
professional
development
6
An Example of Peer Assistance or Assessment by a Critical Friend (CF). Consistent with Bloom. (Educational
Leadership 3-2002).
The purpose of this exercise is for a peer to act as your CF in assisting or assessing you against a specific rubric identified or
developed by you. The rubric(s) for this exercise are found elsewhere. They might come from your course expectations or be
provided by the instructor. This exercise is not graded.
Your name (the person being assessed)
__________________________________________Date___________________________________
Name of CF _______________________________________Location of course ________________________
School________________________
Rubric being used in this
exercise._____________________________________________________________________________________
Rubric Value awarded to you as determined by your CF (Circle One): 1 2 3 4.
Procedure for Part One:
You report orally to your CF. Your CF evaluates the report using the rubric cited above as a guideline. Your CF may ask questions
you. Upon completion of your report your CF evaluates your response consistent with the factors cited in the rubric. Finally the CF
assigns a value to your report consistent with the point structure cited in the rubric. The Rubric Value is recorded above. This
completes Part One.
Procedure for Part Two:
The rubric listed below is used for this purpose. Now it is your opportunity to assess your CF Do so by classifying his/her
contribution in one of the categories listed below. In particular notice the category for a 4th point (Monica=s Rubric). Award
Monica=s Rubric only when you feel that the assessment of you by your CF was exemplary and you are prepared to explain and
defend your reasons for your decision.
CAUTION: Make this a valid exercise. If both you and tour CF intend to arbitrarily award each other the best possible
score, skip the exercise as it has no value.
Activity
Zero Points
One Point
Two points
Three Points
My
assessment
of my
Critical
Friend
(CF).
Did not
participate
because
____________
____________
____________
__________ __
Or, see
Caution.
Exercise of limited value. My CF
did not follow the guidelines for
this exercise. My report was not
critiqued. Questions asked of me
focused on the Information and
Comprehension. Observations made
by my CF mostly reinforced my
views.
Exercise had some value.
Questions asked of me considered
full range of Bloom=s six
categories. Observations by my CF
mostly laudatory. I was not
challenged to go beyond the
content of my report. The exercise
did cause me to reflect on how I
communicate.
Exercise was valua
Questions asked of
to various categorie
Bloom. My CF cha
to think reflectively
creatively, meta cog
was challenged to r
the question: So wh
My reasons for awarding Monica=s Fourth Point are:
________________________________________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________________________________________
____________________________________
Creedon/Ross Pompano Beach, FL Revised 11-03
Rubrics: Behavior and Classroom Management
7
Each of the rubrics listed below relates to a course objective. As with objectives, rubrics ought to be clear and distinct. The rubrics
cited here have been developed consistent with the six categories of Bloom’s cognitive taxonomy. They can be used for learner
assistance or assessment. In addition they can serve as accountability tools for instructor performance. Rubrics ought to be shared
with students before instruction begins. Rubrics can be generated by the instructor or by students. They can be used as assistance
and assessment indicators with one student, a pairs of students, a group or a team.
The rubrics are scored using a point system of from one point to four points. Four points indicates an exemplary effort and has a
condition associated with it before it can be awarded.
The performance criteria for many of the rubrics listed here are essentially the same and are consistent with Bloom. In those
instances the criteria is cited only once as indicated below. These are designated by the symbol: 􀀁. Those not reflecting Bloom are
separately defined. In all cases failure to do the exercise results in zero points.
One Point: Limited recall/ comprehension. No consideration of Bloom beyond comprehension or to own practice.
􀀁 Limited: Not broad in scope or understanding
Two Points: Adequate comprehension. Limited consideration of Bloom categories 3-6 and to own practice
􀀁 Adequate: Of acceptable quality but less than good or excellent
Three Points: Good application of all Bloom categories as well as to own practice
􀀁 Good quality but less than excellent
Four Points Monica’s Rubric: Exemplary/Excellent. Be prepared to explain your reasons for thinking so.
􀀁 Exemplary: Conforming to an ultimate form of excellence
Topic One Two Three Four: Monica’s
Rubric
Obj 1: Critique of 4
approaches to CM
cited in syllabus
􀀁 􀀁 􀀁 􀀁
Obj 2: Generating an
approach to CM for
your own practice
Concept of CM
limited to
compliance and
control through
punitive discipline
Concept of CM
while focusing on
compliance and
control does
consider learning
style and inclusion.
Concept of CM
takes a broad view
with focus on a
positive learning
environment based
on mutual respect
􀀁
Obj 3: Pre-Course
Reflective
Practitioner 3 part
exercise
# 1 Description
#2 Research
#3 Point of View
One or more days
late .Did not follow
guidelines. No
application to own
practice
On time. Did not
follow guidelines
Own opinion cited.
On time Followed
guidelines. Limited
On time. Followed
guidelines. Limited
application to own
practice.
On time Followed
guidelines. Less then
three sources used.
On time. Followed
guidelines. Adequate
Requirement met.
Applied to own
practice.
Suggestions for RP
#2.
On time. Followed
guidelines. Four or
more sources used.
On time. Followed
guidelines. Good
Not applicable
Not applicable
􀀁
Obj 4: Critique of
an author’s approach
to CM. Use Bloom
􀀁
􀀁
􀀁
Not applicable
8
Obj 5: Six CM
models from Tauber
􀀁 􀀁 􀀁 Not applicable
Obj 6: Explanation,
examples,
application of your
CM approach
Limited. See
definition above
Adequate. See
definition above
Good. See definition
above.
Exemplary. See
definition above.
Obj 7: Critique
approach to CM at
your school.
􀀁
􀀁
􀀁
􀀁
Obj 8: Action
Research. Team
Assessment
Limited application
of process outlined
in monograph
Adequate
application of
process outlined in
monograph
Good application of
process outlined in
monograph
Exemplary. See
definition above.
Obj 9: Learning
Style and Inclusion.
Limited
understanding and
application to own
practice
Adequate
understanding and
application to own
practice
Good understanding
and application to
own practice
Exemplary. See
definition above
Obj 10: Relate
Creedon Four
Questions to CM
Limited
understanding and
application to own
practice
Adequate
understanding and
application to own
practice
Good understanding
and application to
own practice
Exemplary. See
definition above.
Rubrics: Supervision, Staff Development and Leadership (SSD&L) Part 4
Each of the rubrics listed below relates to a course objective. As with objectives, rubrics ought to be clear and distinct. The rubrics
cited here have been developed consistent with the six categories of Bloom’s cognitive taxonomy. They can be used for learner
assistance or assessment. In addition they can serve as accountability tools for instructor performance. Rubrics ought to be shared
with students before instruction begins. Rubrics can be generated by the instructor or by students. They can be used as assistance
and assessment indicators with one student, a pairs of students, a group or a team.
The rubrics are scored using a point system of from one point to four points. Four points indicates an exemplary effort and has a
condition associated with it before it can be awarded.
The performance criteria for many of the rubrics listed here are essentially the same and are consistent with Bloom. In those
instances the criteria is cited only once as indicated below. These are designated by the symbol: 􀀁. Those not reflecting Bloom are
separately defined. In all cases failure to do the exercise results in zero points.
One Point: Limited recall/ comprehension. No consideration of Bloom beyond comprehension or to own practice.
􀀁 Limited: Not broad in scope or understanding
Two Points: Adequate comprehension. Limited consideration of Bloom categories 3-6 and to own practice
􀀁 Adequate: Of acceptable quality but less than good or excellent
Three Points: Good application of all Bloom categories as well as to own practice
􀀁 Good quality but less than excellent
Four Points Monica’s Rubric: Exemplary/Excellent. Be prepared to explain your reasons for thinking so.
􀀁 Exemplary: Conforming to an ultimate form of excellence
9
Topic One Two Three Four: Monica’s
Rubric
Obj 1: Review of all
course material
􀀁 􀀁 􀀁 Not applicable
Obj 3: Pre-Course
Reflective
Practitioner 3 part
exercise
# 1 Description
#2 Research
#3 Point of View
Late one or more
days. .Did not
follow guidelines.
No application to
own practice
On time. Did not
follow guidelines
Own opinion cited.
On time Followed
guidelines. Limited
On time. Followed
guidelines. Limited
application to own
practice.
On time Followed
guidelines. Less then
three sources used.
On time. Followed
guidelines. Adequate
Requirement met.
Applied to own
practice.
Suggestions for RP
#2.
On time. Followed
guidelines. Four or
more sources used.
On time. Followed
guidelines. Good
Not applicable
Not applicable
􀀁
Obj 3: Bloom based
critique of Creedon
monograph:
Administrators,
Managers, Leaders.
􀀁
􀀁
􀀁
Not applicable
Obj 4. Bloom based
critique of two
Creedon
monographs:
Constructivism, and
Bloom.
􀀁 􀀁 􀀁 Not applicable
Obj 5. Explanation,
examples,
application to your
own practice.
Limited. See
definition above
Adequate. See
definition above
Good. See definition
above.
Exemplary. See
definition above.
Obj 6. Text:
Sergiovanni and
Starratt.
􀀁
􀀁
􀀁
􀀁
Obj 7. Your Revised
definition of
SSD&L.
Limited. See
definition above
Adequate
understanding and
application to own
practice
Good understanding
and application to
own practice
Exemplary. See
definition above
Obj 8: Action
Research. Team
Assessment
Limited application
of process outlined
in monograph
Adequate
application of
process outlined in
monograph
Good application of
process outlined in
monograph
Exemplary. See
definition above.
Obj 10: Relate
Creedon Four
Questions to
SSD&L.
Limited
understanding and
application to own
practice
Adequate
understanding and
application to own
practice
Good understanding
and application to
own practice
Exemplary. See
definition above.
10
Peer Assessment: A
rubric for peer
assessment is on a
separate sheet.
See separate
exercise
See separate
exercise
See separate
exercise
See separate
exercise
Ipse dixit
Lawrence P. Creedon
lpcreedon@aol.com
Pompano Beach, Florida
May 2003
Proposal for Supervision Independent Study
Sara Parent
Start Date; Jan, 13, 2005
End Date; TBA
1. Three main course assignments
A. One page rumination on what I believe a supervision course might include.
B. Two journal entries concerning how research is progressing, what I have learned, and the problems I have encountered.
C. A finally written project concerning a topic of my choice.
2. Daily Dialogue;
D. I would like to maintain a daily (or every other day) dialogue with the professor via the internet.
3. Personal Expectations Rubric; (accountability for completing the assignment).
Below Average
Average
Above Average
Attentive
Responses
Rarely focuses on
the professors
questions. Asks
questions
concerning
information that has
already been
covered.
Focuses on what
the professors is
writing some of the
time. The teacher
must sometimes
nag, prod, and
remind to keep this
person engaged.
Furthermore,
participant often
engages in relevant
but inappropriate
side conversations.
Gives the professor
consistent and
undivided attention.
Very self-directed.
Participates in online
discussion.
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Preparedness
Rarely completes
work according to
scheduled due
dates.
Sometimes
completes work
according to
scheduled due
dates.
Always completes
work according to
scheduled due
dates.
Is always ready to
discuses material.
Effort
Work reflects very
little effort on the
part of this student.
Work reflects some
effort from this
student.
Work reflects this
student’s best
efforts.
4. Personal Assignment Rubric; (How to assess the assignments)
Assignments
Below Average Average Above Average
Assignment A
Work reflects very
little effort on the
part of this student.
No thought has
been pt into the
writing.
The students
express many ideas
in a logical and
interesting manner.
Demonstrates an
interest and
enjoyment in her
writing. Ideas are
clear and
interesting.
Assignment B
Journals reflect
very little effort on
the part of this
student. The
Journals are not
consistent and/or
pertinent.
Journal entries
address; how
research is
progressing, what
is being learned,
and the problems
encountered. The
journals show
much effort.
Journals
demonstrate an
interest and
enjoyment in
learning and
problem solving.
Ideas are clear and
interesting.
Assignment C
Work reflects very
little effort on the
part of this student.
The student
expresses her
interest and
outlines the thesis
clearly.
The student
expresses her
interest and
outlines the thesis
clearly. It is
obvious that a
large amount of
effort went into the
creation of this
peace of writing.
Assignment D
Student and
professor
communicate
rarely.
Student and
professor
communicate
regularly.
Student and
professor
communicate
regularly, and the
quality of the
communication is
very high.
12
84.926 Issues and Influences in Education: Course Rubric
Activity No points 1-2 points 3-4 points 5-6
points
EDUCATIONAL AND
CULTURAL
ODYSSEY
! No
Educatio
nal
Odyssey
submitte
d.
! Odyssey includes only two
elements listed .
! Odyssey submitted two days after
first day of class
! Paper has severe grammatical
errors.
! Odyssey includes at least four elements
listed on pre-course assignment sheet or !
Odyssey submitted day after course begin
! Several errors using English
grammatical structures.
! Refle
backgro
(your O
element
assignm
! Writi
college
! Submi
PAPER #1
PHASE ONE
! No
paper
submitte
d
! Does not describe a
specific educational
concern, issue or
influence or paper goes
beyond description. !
Paper has problems with
English grammatical
structures
! Describes a specific
educational concern, issue
or influence
! Writing conforms to standard college
English and demonstrates communicative
competence
PAPER #2
PHASE TWO
! No paper
submitted
! Uses only one
reference
! Paper has severe
grammatical problems
! Uses only two references
! Paper has some problems
with
English grammatical
structures and/or
! Uses
and a m
(exclud
issue !
English
PAPER #3
PHASE THREE
! No
paper
submitte
d
! Paper has severe
grammatical problems
! Does not submit a
handout
! Does not analyze or synthesize issue.
! Paper has some problems
with English grammatical
structures
!Incomplete Handout
! Appli
!Analyzes
from Paper
!Handout
references,
various sid
makes it an
! Writing
JOURNAL
! Does
not
submit
journal
! Writes a total of two
journal entries or
! Submits journal after
due date B two times
! Writes one journal entry
before course begins and two
entries during course or
!Journals do not reflect on
course (for example: entries
are a diary of class
happenings without
reflection).
! Submi
a minim
before
of thre
Entries
discuss
present
and con
issues.
CLASSROOM
PARTICIPATION
! Absent
for two
or more
classes
! Absent for one class
or does not participate
actively in discussions
and activities
! Present for all classes
and
! Participates only when
called
upon, rarely initiates
comment or contributes to
discussions
! Prese
particip
discuss
initiat
contrib
to clas
Grading: A = 30-34 points B = 24-29 points C = 18-23 points
Helen L. Ross
13
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